Courtside

Your Guide to GW sports

Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2013 6:07 p.m.

Red Auerbach in inaugural class of A-10 legends

When the Atlantic 10 honors its inaugural class of Men’s Basketball Legends, GW will be represented by one of the greatest figures in basketball history – Arnold “Red” Auerbach.

The men’s basketball legends will be honored March 16 at the Barclays Center, prior to the A-10 tournament semifinals. Each of the 16 members of the 2013 class were chosen by a member institution for their impact on that university’s men’s basketball program.

Red Auerback

GW alumnus Red Auerbach, right, shares a laugh with former GW men’s basketball head coach Karl Hobbs in 2004. Hatchet File Photo

“The considerable contributions each of these gentlemen made to their institution and its basketball program played an important role in shaping the foundation of men’s basketball in the Atlantic 10,” A-10 Commissioner Bernadette V. McGlade said in a release. “Whether it was building a program that eventually became a founding member or furthering the conference as it grew into a basketball power, each of the honorees is a part of the fabric of A-10 history and we’re thrilled to be able to honor them.”

 Auerbach was a guard for the Colonials from 1937-40, and GW went 39-18 during his career, which he capped by leading the Colonials in scoring his senior season.
After his graduation from the University, Auerbach spent three years as a player and four as a coach in the Basketball Association of America. He spent a year coaching the NBA’s Tri-Cities Blackhawks before being named head coach of the Boston Celtics in 1950.
Over 16 seasons at the helm of the Celtics, Auerbach netted nine NBA titles. He went on to serve as Boston’s general manager from 1966-84 and team president and vice chairman from 1984 until his death in 2006, watching the Celtics win an additional seven titles in that time. His 16 total NBA championships with Boston make him the most decorated team official in NBA history – and Auerbach kept his season tickets at GW until his death in 2006.