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GW players and fans celebrate as GW is given a No. 9 seed in the NCAA Tournament's East region. Cameron Lancaster | Assistant Photo Editor

GW players and fans celebrate as GW is given a No. 9 seed in the NCAA Tournament’s East region. Cameron Lancaster | Assistant Photo Editor

Forget about picking your bracket winners based on weirdest mascots or best color combination. Try annual tuition payments.

Websites like The Awl and Slate have already done the math, and determined that GW would win the NCAA Tournament pretty handily if high tuition determined winners. The Colonials would blow away the competition, actually, with at least a $3,000 cushion in each matchup.

That’s probably not the best way to judge college pricing, however. If you were to pick based on average net price – or how much students pay after financial aid – GW would lose in the title game to American, according to a Hatchet analysis of Department of Education data. So, there’s some solace.

Adding insult to injury? GW would be knocked out in the first round if you used the NCAA’s Academic Progress Rate, according to Inside Higher Ed, and the second round if you used U.S. News & World Report rankings.

But remember: Georgetown isn’t dancing. Get those brackets filled out – using whatever method suits you.

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Saturday, March 15, 2014 10:22 a.m.

Photos: GW vs. UMass at Barclays Center

Brooklyn, N.Y. — GW’s 85-77 win over UMass on Friday night was the Colonials’ first win in the Atlantic 10 tournament since 2007. The game drew thousands of students and alumni to Brooklyn, N.Y.

Hatchet photo editor Samuel Klein was on the sidelines to capture the action.

Isaiah Armwood goes up for a slam against UMass on Friday night. Samuel Klein | Photo Editor

Isaiah Armwood goes up for a slam against UMass on Friday night. Samuel Klein | Photo Editor

Patricio Garino is hit by a UMass defender as he goes up for a basket. The sophomore scored 10 points in the Atlantic 10 quarterfinal. Samuel Klein | Photo Editor

Patricio Garino is hit by a UMass defender as he goes up for a basket. The sophomore scored 10 points in the Atlantic 10 quarterfinal. Samuel Klein | Photo Editor

Guard Maurice Creek gets a hug after Friday night's game in Brooklyn. Samuel Klein | Photo Editor

Guard Maurice Creek gets a hug after Friday night’s game in Brooklyn. Samuel Klein | Photo Editor

A raucous GW fan section cheered in the Barclays Center on Friday night. The Colonials drew nearly 2,000 fans to Brooklyn. Samuel Klein | Photo Editor

A raucous GW fan section cheered in the Barclays Center on Friday night. The Colonials drew nearly 2,000 fans to Brooklyn. Samuel Klein | Photo Editor

The Colonials made the trip to the Barclays Center in Brooklyn on Friday night, playing in front 8,755 fans. Samuel Klein | Photo Editor

The Colonials made the trip to the Barclays Center in Brooklyn on Friday night, playing in front 8,755 fans. Samuel Klein | Photo Editor

GW's bench erupts during the Colonials' red-hot second half, when they shot 51.7 percent from the field. Samuel Klein | Photo Editor

GW’s bench erupts during the Colonials’ red-hot second half, when they shot 51.7 percent from the field. Samuel Klein | Photo Editor

Head coach Mike Lonergan, in his third year on the GW sidelines, calls for a play in his team's Friday night win. Lonergan was a presence as usual on the sidelines: waving, stomping and flailing during big plays. Samuel Klein | Photo Editor

Head coach Mike Lonergan, in his third year on the GW sidelines, calls for a play in his team’s Friday night win. Lonergan was a presence as usual on the sidelines: waving, stomping and flailing during big plays. Samuel Klein | Photo Editor

Guard Maurice Creek lunges back for the ball in Friday night's win over UMass. Samuel Klein | Photo Editor

Guard Maurice Creek lunges back for the ball in Friday night’s win over UMass. Samuel Klein | Photo Editor

Sophomore Kevin Larsen drives in the paint on Friday night. The forward scored just six points but grabbed seven rebounds. Samuel Klein | Photo Editor

Sophomore Kevin Larsen drives in the paint on Friday night. The forward scored just six points but grabbed seven rebounds. Samuel Klein | Photo Editor

Patricio Garino, Kevin Larsen and Joe McDonald celebrate in GW's 85-77 win. Samuel Klein | Photo Editor

Patricio Garino, Kevin Larsen and Joe McDonald celebrate in GW’s 85-77 win. Samuel Klein | Photo Editor

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Members of the men's water polo team dressed in togas and cheered raucously earlier this year at the Smith Center. Hatchet File Photo by Cameron Lancaster

Members of the men’s water polo team dressed in togas and cheered raucously earlier this year at the Smith Center. Hatchet File Photo by Cameron Lancaster

Ben Krimmel, a senior majoring in international affairs, is a Hatchet columnist.

Foggy Bottom had become a virtual ghost town by Monday afternoon of spring break.

Except for a few holdovers — like myself — milling around campus, the only people around were prospective students on tours. With the sun cascading down on the Smith Center, I snuck up on one such group to listen for any mention of the men’s basketball team.

Knowing the GW marketing team’s penchant for hyperbole, I expected the guide to proclaim the basketball team serious NCAA Tournament contenders next to the likes of Florida and Kansas.

Instead, the bragging was rather scant. The tour guide simply stated that there had been a few attendance records set during this year’s season. I was mystified.

No mention of the 23 wins – the most since 2007 – and nothing about the team’s No. 3 seed in this weeks A-10 Tournament. The guide didn’t even let his group know that tickets are free for students. This may have been the guide’s only chance to boast about the University without any hint of irony, and he let the opportunity go by.

Of course, the omission of more statistics about GW’s winning season was this particular tour guide’s choice. But perhaps the underselling of the team’s success by this student and others on campus can be chalked up to the University’s collective uncertainty on how to promote the men’s basketball team’s victories – a new source of GW pride – to prospective students.

This is something that GW should highlight more, certainly at least as much as we tout the school’s proximity to national landmarks.

Sure, one winning season certainly does not mean there will be a flood of applications from students more interested in “bracketology” than election forecasting. But as the basketball team brings more national attention to the University, and some seedlings of the change have already taken root.

The increase in this year’s student attendance demonstrates the beginnings of a greater sense of community — something the University is often criticized for failing to create.

Higher attendance is a testament to the work of Director of Athletics and Recreation Patrick Nero, the leaders of the Colonial Army, the players and men’s basketball head coach Mike Lonergan. Whether it is the pregame tailgates, t-shirt giveaways or a free trip for students to the game at George Mason, this has been a year where pride seems to finally be coming naturally to GW students.

Tour guides and all other current students would be unwise to continue using athletics as a punchline. In fact, they should make it a focal point: For the millions who fill out an NCAA Tournament bracket, GW will now be known as one of 68.

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ST. LOUIS — The men’s basketball team had several possessions and scoring runs that kept the Colonials close with the No. 10 team in the country.

Saint Louis would make a run, GW (20-7, 8-5) would push back, but forced errors and a debilitating defense would lead to a 66-59 loss for the Colonials. The loss – on the road in front of a hostile sellout crowd – was GW’s third in four games.

“I’m glad we didn’t fold. It was a great atmosphere and I’m glad we came back and tied it up,” head coach Mike Lonergan said.

But, he added: “We’ve got to get our swagger back.”

The Colonials stormed back from a 14-point deficit to tie the game with a little over nine minutes left in the game. But GW’s shooting then went ice cold. It was a story of the game: close, but not quite enough.

GW played a one-dimensional first half, scoring 16 of their 19 points from field goals inside the paint. Sophomores Kevin Larsen and Joe McDonald carried the Colonials offense, scoring 20 of GW’s 27 first half points, with Larsen leading the team with 12.

The Saint Louis defense, which entered the game as the ninth-best scoring defense in the nation, held GW to 35 percent shooting in the first half. Throughout the half, the Billikens backcourt swarmed GW ball handlers, forcing nine first-half turnovers off five steals, and often times made it difficult for the Colonials to even pass the ball.

“It was just tough to get any wing entries,” McDonald said. “We had to do a lot of high ball screens with me and Kevin because you know, we couldn’t get it in from the wing so we just had to improvise a little bit.”

After a painfully slow first half, the men’s basketball team had a chance to go into the half with momentum and cut a Saint Louis lead, that was as large as 11, down to single digits in the final seconds.

An errant pass by SLU’s Jake Barnett led to a steal at midcourt by sophomore Kevin Larsen. After pushing the ball up the floor, GW found senior Nemanja Mikic in the corner for an uncontested three.

A miss by Mikic and a rebound by junior John Kopriva would lead to a second-chance opportunity for the Colonials as Kopriva looked for Mikic who stood unguarded. But a misdirected pass and turnover by Kopriva would lead to a Billikens dunk on the other end as the clock expired.

The Colonials’ first-half efforts were stunted by foul trouble from two of the team’s season leaders: senior Isaiah Armwood and graduate student Maurice Creek. Armwood would be limited to just 12 first half minutes while Creek would play just 10.

By the end of the half, between Garino, Creek, and Armwood go a combined 1-for-6 from the field.

“Honestly, Patricio and Mo Creek couldn’t even get open,” Lonergan said. “Mo, they played physical with him, and he couldn’t get the ball, he really struggled.”

Creek and Armwood would log heavier minutes in the second half of play, but both would struggle offensively. Armwood would finish with six points on 2-for-7 shooting and 11 rebounds. Creek, who wouldn’t score his first field goal until 13:50 left in the second half, would finish with five points on 2-for-12 shooting. Creek would miss all five of his three-point attempts.

On the offensive end, Saint Louis was able to break GW’s 1-3-1 zone defense with ball movement, converting 16 field goals on 10 first half assists. The Billikens shot 55 percent, led by 10 first-half points from senior Jordair Jett, and would end the half with a 12 point lead.

At the half, Lonergan told his 20-win team to start playing like an NCAA Tournament contender.

“At halftime, I just said we’re not playing with enough energy. I said, ‘Hey you want to come here and compete, we’re on TV, this is a big game for us,’” he said. “I said I just want to play hard, I didn’t think we played real hard.”

GW would respond, coming out aggressive in the second half and slowly chipping away at the SLU lead while tightening up on the defensive end. The offensive charge was led by McDonald and sophomore Patricio Garino.

After being affected by the SLU pressure in the first half, McDonald adjusted and was able to run set plays for the offense while finding his own shot. McDonald would finish with 13 second-half points, six of those points coming from beyond the arc.

After attempting just a single shot in the first half Garino went 3-for-5 in the second and finished with 11 points and six rebounds. Defensively, the Colonials outrebounded the Billikens 26-17 after being outrebounded in the first half by three.

In the span of just under 11 minutes, GW would erase a 14-point Saint Louis lead. But like most of the game, Saint Louis would regain composure, and take an 8-0 run to extend their lead, something that Billikens’ head coach Jim Crews credits to his team’s ability to regain the rebound battle.

But the big GW run would come at a price. Lonergan said that he believed the 11-minute span knocked the energy out of his starting five. He added that without a productive bench, forced him to leave the starters in for extended minutes.

SLU would keep GW in the game due to lackluster free throw shooting, shooting 9-15 from the line. The Colonials would come as close as three points, but multiple missed three-point looks by McDonald and Garino down the stretch would seal the victory for the Billikens.

“I thought maybe we lost our composure, but Patricio came down and just shot like a 30 footer,” Lonergan said.

Lonergan had one timeout remaining in the game but opted not to use it, saying after the game that he tried to have Garino go off a screen but says the sophomore’s inexperience and quick shot may have led to the quick shot.

GW returns to the Smith Center next Sunday where they will host George Mason at 1 p.m.

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MBB Vs. Fordham from The GW Hatchet on Vimeo.


Created with Admarket’s flickrSLiDR.

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Created with Admarket’s flickrSLiDR.

Photos by:
Cameron Lancaster | Assistant Photo Editor
Caitlin Harrington | Hatchet Photographer
Desiree Halpern | Hatchet Staff Photographer

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Maybe this will make this afternoon’s 75-65 loss to the Dayton Flyers a little more bearable?

The men’s basketball team has always struggled to pull out a win when traveling to the University of Dayton Arena. The last time the Colonials walked away from Ohio victorious was on Feb. 26, 2005 under head coach Karl Hobbs.

With the game tied at 59 and under a minute to play, a crucial turnover by the Flyers with just seconds left on the clock gave then-GW sophomore Carl Elliot one last opportunity to win the game in regulation with a prayer from close to half court.

The rest is history, and the finish was nothing short of spectacular.

Elliot would go on to be named to the Atlantic 10 all-defensive team at the end of the season and the team as a whole would finish the year 22-8 with a conference title and a first round loss to Georgia Tech in the NCAA tournament.

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Friday, Jan. 31, 2014 1:03 p.m.

Skyler White called his shot

The Colonials’ victory over La Salle on Wednesday was mostly forgettable. GW steamrolled a weaker opponent and cruised to their 17th victory.

However, the last two minutes of the game were worth reliving.

Colonials fans were practically begging head coach Mike Lonergan to put in forward Skyler White – a walk-on freshman who endeared himself after stopping mid-play to tie his shoe earlier in the season.

And with a minute and 38 seconds left on the clock, Lonergan relented. In came White.

From my seat under the hoop, I heard White made the boldest of predictions: “If I get the ball, I’m gonna make a three,” he told his teammate Paris Maragkos.

And if you can excuse my poor camerawork, you can see what happens next. From a dish from freshman Miguel Cartagena, White hits a three.

The entire Smith Center (including the GW bench) erupted, and kept celebrating when White grabs a defensive rebound on the other side of the court. Fittingly, the game’s last play is a second White rebound.

White called his shot, cementing himself as GW’s Babe Ruth.

Zach Montellaro is The Hatchet’s multimedia editor.

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Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014 11:57 p.m.

Photos and Video: GW takes down La Salle


Created with Admarket’s flickrSLiDR.

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Freshman guard Miguel Cartagena looks to go around a VCU defender earlier this month. Cameron Lancaster | Assistant Photo Editor

Freshman guard Miguel Cartagena looks to go around a VCU defender earlier this month. Cameron Lancaster | Assistant Photo Editor

Ben Krimmel, a senior majoring in international affairs, is a Hatchet columnist.

On a basketball court, freshman Miguel Cartagena doesn’t look very imposing. He’s listed as 6-foot, but that might be stretching it. He often looks a bit unsure of himself when taking the ball up the court, or at least, he looks like a freshman.

But Cartagena could be the man that can help GW fans from losing their minds without sophomore Kethan Savage.

Cartagena can’t replace Savage and shouldn’t attempt to play like him. Rather, starting tonight against La Salle, the freshman should emulate the style of play of the once-struggling junior John Kopriva.

During Saturday’s win at George Mason, Cartagena would advance the ball up the court and immediately peer over his shoulder to get instructions from his head coach. The offense was methodical, slow and a few times a better defender could have knocked the ball away from him when he was distracted and looking for guidance.

Now, in Cartagena’s defense, he was virtually on his own, as Nemanja Mikic, John Kopriva, Paris Maragkos and Nick Griffin provided little off the ball movement. During this reserve only time on the floor, Cartagena shot 1-5 with two turnovers and two personal fouls.

In 17 minutes, Kopriva forward had six boards, two points, and added two steals. Kopriva isn’t going to dazzle with sensational scoring numbers, rather his game Saturday was to fill space on defense and rebound. (Based on my last round of GW predictions, expect Kopriva to pour in at least 15 Wednesday night.)

Cartagena just needs to play smart and play a clean game. No one is expecting him to make any all-rookie teams. But if he can control the ball and keep a steady tempo, the rest of the squad can take it away.

Whenever he gets the chance, the freshman should feed the ball to sophomore forward Kevin Larsen. Larsen has responded to criticism following a poor shooting night (3-10 from the field) against La Salle last time with a run of four excellent performances.

The Colonials will look for their fifth straight victory tonight. If GW hopes to survive a lethargic first half, they’ll need another dominating second half when they shoot 66.7 percent from the field and 50 percent from behind the arc.

But if the Savage-less Colonials are unable to overcome any offensive sluggishness and fall (again) to La Salle, concern shouldn’t compound with Savage’s gradual march to the locker-room. With a third of the season remaining, GW still have some budding playmakers it can count on.

This post was updated Jan. 29, 2014 at 5:05 p.m. to reflect the following:
Correction appended
The Hatchet misspelled Paris Maragkos’ last name.

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