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Thursday, Jan. 12, 2012 3:12 p.m.

Elliott School researchers awarded $2-million Carnegie grant

Marc Lynch, Elliott School, Political Science

Director of the Institute for Middle East Studies Marc Lynch, right, hosted several political science professors to discuss the revolutions in Egypt during an event in the Elliott School last September. Lynch directs The Project on Middle East Political Science, one of three research programs that will benefit from the recent grant. | Hatchet File Photo

The Elliott School of International Affairs’ research on the Middle East, Eurasia and aspiring world powers received a $2-million boost Wednesday from the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

The grant will continue the corporation’s support of three major research programs in the school: the Project on Middle East Political Science, the Program on New Approaches to Research and Security in Eurasia and the Worldviews of Aspiring Powers Project.

As the largest single contribution the Carnegie Corporation has made to the Elliott School, the grant matches the total external research funding the school earned during the 2010-2011 school year, according to data from the school’s annual report.

“We are proud to support this institution, which works toward one of Andrew Carnegie’s most cherished goals: the advancement of international peace,” Vartan Gregorian, president of the Carnegie Corporation of New York, said in a release.

The Project on Middle East Political Science helps support the Middle East Channel, a blog on ForeignPolicy.com that received 45 million page views last year. The project, directed by professor Marc Lynch, also holds events at the Elliott School and conducts research.

Since its launch at Harvard University in the late 1990s, the Program on New Approaches to Research and Security in Eurasia has published more than 50 policy memos per year on Russia, the Caucasus, Central Asia and East Europe. The Elliott School became its home in 2009.

The Worldviews of Aspiring Powers Project will study energy security debates in China, Japan, India, Russia and South Korea during the second phase of its research supported by the Carnegie Corporation this year.

The Carnegie Corporation issued the grant in September, according to its website, but only announced the grant Wednesday.

The award comes on the heels of the Elliott School’s top-10 ranking among international relations programs last week in a survey performed by researchers at the College of William and Mary and published in Foreign Policy magazine.

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