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Justine Coleman

Assistant Copy Editor Volume 113 The GW Hatchet
jcoleman@gwhatchet.com · @JustineColeman8

A woman previously barred from campus was arrested for unlawful entry after being found in a women’s restroom on the third floor of Rice Hall Wednesday, according to a Metropolitan Police Department report.

The woman was detained after officers confirmed she was already barred from University property, University Police Department Officer Craig Thomas stated in the report. He said in the report that she was already in custody when he arrived on the scene at about 2:48 p.m.

The woman complained of several injuries and officers notified D.C. Fire and Emergency Medical Services, according to the report. She was taken to the GW Hospital emergency room at about 3:35 p.m. and was awaiting being discharged from the hospital for transportation to the Second District police station at about 5:22 p.m., the document states.

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Updated: Jan. 6, 2017 at 10:50 a.m.

A 79-year-old black male using a walker went missing Thursday in the 2100 block of I Street NW, according to a D.C. alert.

The Metropolitan Police Department sent out an alert to members of the second district of D.C. and tweeted identifying information shortly before 7 p.m. Thursday.

The man went missing at 1 p.m. and was last seen wearing a tan coat with blue jeans. He is 5 foot 10 inches tall, weighs 105 pounds and has a medium complexion, and his walker has tennis balls on the wheels, according to the alert.

The alert instructed people who found the man to call 911 instead of interacting.

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A “disorderly” person in the 7-Eleven in Mitchell Hall was arrested on Jan. 1 after officers discovered he had been barred from campus, according to a Metropolitan Police Department report.

University Police Department Officer Zachary Byrd responded to the scene at around 4:48 p.m. to assist MPD with the “disorderly” individual, according to the report.

“Once on scene, it was determined that the subject had been previously barred from the George Washington University Campus,” the report stated.

The person was arrested for unlawful entry and then transported to the Second District police station for processing, according to the document.

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CNN will host a town hall with Speaker Paul Ryan at GW next week, the media outlet announced Tuesday.

Jake Tapper, CNN’s chief Washington correspondent, will speak with Ryan at the event on Jan. 12 from 9 to 10 p.m.

Ryan will discuss the future plans of the Republican Congress during the new administration, including the agenda for the first 100 days that President-elect Donald Trump is in office, according to CNN. Audience members will be able to ask questions during the meeting.

The town hall will air from campus on CNN, CNN International and CNN en Español and will also be live-streamed online.

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Saturday, Dec. 31, 2016 2:59 p.m.

Year in Review: Top headlines from 2016

Although the year may have flown by for some, it has been an eventful 366 days at GW. With major announcements like University President Steven Knapp’s departure from his post to hacked emails leading to the closure of GW’s Pi Kappa Phi chapter, the headlines keep rolling in – and it doesn’t look they’ll stop any time soon.

Here’s a quick recap of some of the top news stories at GW from 2016:

Body mix-up shuts down donor program

Three families filed a lawsuit against the School of Medicine and Health Sciences after it was revealed that the program had misidentified donors' remains. Hatchet file photo by Olivia Anderson.

Three families filed a lawsuit against the School of Medicine and Health Sciences after it was revealed that the program had misidentified donors’ remains. Hatchet file photo by Olivia Anderson.

Officials shut down the body donor program at the School of Medicine and Health Services in February after realizing the remains of donors had been misidentified. Fifty bodies could not be identified as of February.

Officials said they had been aware since the fall of 2015 that the program’s management was not sufficient for families. In September, three families filed a class action lawsuit against the University for the “gross mismanagement” of the donated bodies.

A switch to open dining

The closure of J Street was one of several major changes made to GW dining's options over the past year. Hatchet file photo by Dan Rich | Photo Editor.

The closure of J Street was one of several major changes made to GW dining’s options over the past year. Hatchet file photo by Dan Rich | Photo Editor.

Officials announced in March that students would now use a new open-dining plan, meaning students were no longer required to spend money in a dining hall and instead had a set number of dollars to use at nearby vendors. Combined with the closure of the main – and infamous – dining hall J Street on the main campus, students entered the fall semester facing a whole landscape when it came to dining on campus.

The University also announced plans to host five restaurants in the new residence hall District House. Although one of the restaurants has opened, four remain untouched, a surprise to students who had expected to have access to eateries in the basement, and past the Halloween start date officials had previously given.

Feinman elected SA President

Erika Feinman celebrates after winning the Student Association presidential election in March. Hatchet File Photo.

Erika Feinman celebrates after winning the Student Association presidential election in March. Hatchet File Photo.

Erika Feinman was chosen to become the president of the Student Association with 53 percent of the vote in March, becoming the first SA president to openly identify with a non-binary gender. They ran a campaign promoting student representation in the Board of Trustees, which a trustee committee began researching in August.

Bye to Bronson

Rapper Action Bronson was originally chosen to headline Spring Fling in March, until students expressed their disapproval of his song “Consensual Rape” from 2011. At first, Program Board released a statement recognizing the criticism but sticking with the performer choice, but later decided to remove the rapper from the lineup – a choice that garnered national attention and headlines.

A spring start to becoming Greek

Greek life groups will soon only be able to add freshmen members in the spring. Hatchet file photo by Sam Hardgrove | Assistant Photo Editor

Greek life groups will soon only be able to add freshmen members in the spring. Hatchet file photo by Sam Hardgrove | Assistant Photo Editor

In April, the University announced that all sorority and fraternity recruitment will occur in the spring semester starting next year. Students planning on joining Greek life will need to complete 12 credit hours before being recruited, unlike any other student group on campus, which officials said will help students adjust to being at college before making such a major commitment. But the decision wasn’t without criticism: Greek life student leaders said they felt left out of the decision-making for deferred recruitment.

And that’s a Knapp

University President Steven Knapp announced that he will step down at the end of this academic year. Hatchet file photo

University President Steven Knapp announced that he will step down at the end of this academic year. Hatchet file photo

In June, University President Steven Knapp announced he will depart from his job in the summer of 2017. By the time he steps down, Knapp’s 10 year-long tenure will be marked by the completion of projects like District House and the Science and Engineering Hall, an major expansion of GW’s research portfolio and the start of major budget cuts to the central administration.

As Knapp prepares to leave, the Board of Trustees has begun its search for a new president. But faculty have criticized the selection committee as not being diverse enough when it comes to faculty representation, which they claim could potentially lead to essential candidates to be missed. In October, the Board of Trustees released the presidential profile, showing that GW is looking for a president who is dedicated to diversity and has creative fundraising ideas.

Loner-gone

Former men’s basketball coach Mike Lonergan was fired in September after an investigation found that he “engaged in conduct inconsistent with the University’s values.” Hatchet file photo by Dan Rich | Photo Editor.

Former men’s basketball coach Mike Lonergan was fired after allegations of verbal and emotional abuse surfaced in July against him, triggering a Title IX investigation into the accusations.

The University stayed quiet about the investigation until Lonergan was dismissed mid-September. Officials then said the inspection found he “engaged in conduct inconsistent with the University’s values.” Maurice Joseph was soon named as interim head coach for the men’s basketball team, which has a current record of 8-6.

Hacked emails shut down Pi Kappa Phi

The GW chapter of Pi Kappa Phi shut down in October following the DC Leaks release of emails from a White House staffer and former member of the fraternity, Ian Mellul. The emails included messages from the fraternity’s Listserv that did not follow appropriate student conduct according to Christina Witkowicki, the director of student involvement and Greek life.

RAs attempt to unionize

Resident advisers at GW are pushing to become the first unionized student group at a private university. Hatchet file photo.

Resident advisers at GW are pushing to become the first unionized student group at a private university. Hatchet file photo.

Resident advisers at GW filed a petition through the local labor group, Service Employees International Union 500, late November after two years of planning to unionize. The University quickly appealed the petition.

Representatives from both the University and the group of RAs testified at a National Labor Relations Board hearing in December, where it was concluded both groups will submit briefs by Dec. 16 and will be informed of a decision after all the briefs are analyzed.

If the RAs were to unionize, they would be the first student union at a private university in the country.

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University Police Department officers arrested a person barred from campus after the individual entered the Academic Center Wednesday, according to a public incident report from the Metropolitan Police Department.

The report stated that the individual entered the building, which houses Rome and Phillips halls, through the southwest entrance. UPD officers approached the person shortly after 3:30 p.m., after recognizing the individual as having been barred from campus, according to the report.

The individual was then arrested for unlawful entry.

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Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2016 2:26 p.m.

Person arrested for unlawful entry at 7-Eleven

The Metropolitan Police Department arrested an individual early Thursday at the 7-Eleven in Mitchell Hall for unlawful entry, according to a public incident report.

A MPD officer arrived at the residence hall at about 3 a.m. after being informed of an unlawful entry over the radio, according to the report.

The individual was arrested and transported to the Second District station for processing, the report stated.

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All Metro riders will soon be able to double-tap on Instagram and scroll through Twitter while waiting for a train underground.

The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority plans to bring free public Wi-Fi to all underground stations by the end of 2018, The Hill reported Tuesday.

The installation will begin in the summer of 2017 and 60 percent of stations will have Wi-Fi by the end of 2017, according to The Hill. The remaining stations will be outfitted with the service in 2018.

Paul Wiedefeld, general manager and CEO for WMATA, said in a statement that the decision for Wi-Fi updates came from “positive rider feedback” after Wi-Fi access was added at six stations – Union Station, Judiciary Square, Gallery Place, Metro Center, Archives and L’Enfant Plaza. This test program began in August, DCist reported.

WMATA has also aimed to install 200 miles of radio cables to improve emergency radio communication and wireless technology in February after calls from Congress and the Federal Transit Administration for increased safety measures.

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A male was arrested for assaulting a University Police Department officer early Friday morning, according to a public incident report from the Metropolitan Police Department.

UPD officers responded to District House at 10:45 p.m. Thursday to assist with a stuck elevator when they encountered an intoxicated male, the report said.

The man was “uncooperative” and did not follow officer directions. He then “fought” with UPD Officer Craig Thomas while being arrested, according to the report. He was arrested at 12:46 a.m. Friday.

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The D.C. Council passed an eight week universal paid leave act after 15 months of public debate Monday.

With a vote of 9 to 4, the Council sent the bill to Mayor Muriel Bowser for her signature.
If signed, the bill would give all workers in the District the opportunity to take an eight week parental leave, a six week leave to assist a sick family member and a two week personal medical leave.

The paid leave will be funded by a 0.62 percent increase in employer payroll taxes, which is expected to raise $250 million.

These approved paid leave amounts were dramatically cut down from the original proposed bill, which would have given 16 weeks of paid leave to employees experiencing events like caring for a sick relative or having a baby.

Council chair Phil Mendelson said the leave coverage for all D.C. workers, including Maryland and Virginia residents, was important to bring workers to D.C.

“This is a benefit program for every employer in the District that people who want to work will be attracted to working for them,” he said.

Ward 2 Council member Jack Evans has previously brought up concerns for funding paid leave for those who live outside of the city, including during the last Council meeting, claiming it could drain funds intended for D.C. residents.

Under the original bill first proposed last year, employees could have 16 weeks of paid leave. After a little more than a year of negotiations, the family paid leave time was reduced to eight weeks.

Previously, GW teamed up with other universities and businesses to promote an employer mandate program as an alternative to the proposed paid leave plan.

Similarly, an amendment Evans and Ward 3 Council member Mary Cheh’s proposed would have funded the leave through an employer mandate, but provided the same amount of leave for workers. Bowser supported the amendment more than the unamended plan, The Washington Post reported.

In this system, small businesses would receive a tax credit to fund leave programs and have the opportunity to a hardship petition if they are having trouble funding the leave, instead of raising the employer payroll taxes and with a goal of decreasing government bureaucracy.

Evans, along with Council members Yvette Alexander of Ward 7, Brandon Todd of Ward 4 and LaRuby May of Ward 8, voted against the legislation after his and Cheh’s amendment failed.

“I can’t support raising the tax,” Evans said. “I can’t support paying this money to Virginia and Maryland people.”

Cheh of Ward 3 decided to “reluctantly” support the bill to guarantee paid leave to workers by the end of the meeting.

“I thought the amendment that we offered was much better,” she said. “I will vote for this, but I do not think it is the best way to go.”

She was the only Council member to vote for her and Evan’s amendment and for the legislation.

May said she would call on Bowser to veto the bill once it passed.

“It’s upsetting that we’re more focused on helping folk outside the city than the District itself,” she said.

At-large Council member Robert White supported the legislation and said he hopes the nation follows D.C.’s lead in the future.

“This bill although it is not perfect – it will move the District in the right direction for now,” he said.

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