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Apple’s chief executive officer will give the keynote address at Commencement this May, the University announced Wednesday.

Tim Cook, who succeeded Apple co-founder Steve Jobs in August 2011, is the first openly gay CEO on the Fortune 500 list. The 54-year-old came out publicly in a Bloomberg piece in October.

“I’m proud to be gay, and I consider being gay among the greatest gifts God has given me,” he wrote then.

Cook gave the commencement speech at Auburn University, where he earned his bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering, in 2010. He was chief operating officer of Apple at the time.

University-wide Commencement will take place May 17 on the National Mall.

Last year, the University chose celebrity chef José Andrés to headline Commencement. The previous year, actress Kerry Washington sent off the graduating class.

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SA President Nick Gumas thanks senators for passing a bill that will allow students to vote on mandatory sexual violence education sessions at CI. The bill was one of two referendums approved by the SA Senate Monday night. Jordan McDonald | Hatchet Photographer

Student Association President Nick Gumas thanks senators for passing a bill that will allow students to vote on mandatory sexual violence education sessions at Colonial Inauguration. The bill was one of two related to referendums that the SA Senate approved on Monday. Jordan McDonald | Hatchet Photographer

Students will vote on fossil fuel divestment and sexual assault education during student body elections next month.

The Student Association Senate passed two bills Monday night that will place the questions on the ballot in March. One will ask whether the Board of Trustees should disclose GW’s investments in fossil fuel companies and divest. The other will gauge student opinion on whether mandatory sexual violence education should occur during Colonial Inauguration.

SA President Nick Gumas said at a meeting last month that adding mandatory sexual assault education to CI would be his priority this semester, and he encouraged senators to vote for the bill at the beginning of the meeting Monday.

He said it was important to educate students before they come to campus so they’re familiar with University policies as soon as the semester begins.

“We want to make sure students are prepared on day one,” Gumas said.

He later added that he viewed the passing of the bill as the next phase of the “It’s On Us” campaign, which the White House launched this fall.

“This is the follow up in terms of actually tangible policy changes,” he said.

About 40 members of Fossil Free GW attended the meeting to support the bill for a divestment referendum. The bill had narrowly failed at the last SA senate session.

Kyla Lang, the group’s president, said passing the bill would give GW students an opportunity to participate in a debate to which other college campuses across the country had already contributed.

“Voting for this does not mean you support divestment,” she said. “It means you’re giving the right to your college to vote on it.”

The senate also passed a bill that added line-item transfers to the finance committee bylaws. Finance committee chair Ben Pryde, U-At-Large, said it was a practice the committee had always had, but the bill would make the action official.

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Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs and Planning Forrest Maltzman, left, and other top University administrators listened to Corcoran students discuss their schools merger with GW at a town hall meeting Monday afternoon. Sara Gleysteen | Hatchet Photographer

Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs and Planning Forrest Maltzman, left, Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Teresa Murphy and Dean of Student Affairs Peter Konwerski listened to Corcoran students discuss their schools merger with GW at a town hall meeting Monday afternoon. Sara Gleysteen | Hatchet Photographer

Updated: Feb. 24, 2015 at 10:05 a.m.

This post was written by Hatchet reporter Noah Olsen.

About 60 students from the Corcoran College met with top GW administrators in a town hall Monday to air concerns about their experience in the merger process.

Top officials including Dean of Student Affairs Peter Konwerski, Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs and Planning Forrest Maltzman and Vice Provost for Safety and Security Darrell Darnell attended the meeting.

Here are some of the key takeaways:

1. Corcoran Students said they felt ignored and neglected

Several Corcoran students spoke up during the town hall to say they felt GW ignored them in the merger process.

“I came to Corcoran because it was a small school. to see this building sad and pale is terrible. What is the thought process behind having all student services on GW’s Foggy Bottom campus?” one student said. The students did not give their names during the session.

Director of GW Housing Programs Seth Weinshel said at the forum that some students applied to live in an arts affinity next year to help keep a sense of community on GW’s campus.

2. Corcoran graduate programs to be housed on Mount Vernon Campus

Because GW is in the process of selling the Corcoran’s Georgetown building and renovating its 17th street building, the Corcoran’s graduate programs will move to the Mount Vernon campus next fall, said Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Teresa Murphy.

One graduate student raised a concern, however, that parking on the Mount Vernon campus will cost about $700 per semester to park overnight, compared to lower costs at the Fillmore building in Georgetown.

TRR Sotheby’s International Realty is the listing agent for the Fillmore building, which went on the market for $14 million last month.

3. Students want 24/7 access to studio space

Students said during the town hall that their main concern is not getting access to their studio spaces after the Corcoran’s buildings close at night.

Darnell said that within the next month he hopes to have GWorld readers installed in the Corcoran’s 17th street building so students can get into the studio spaces they need.

“Right now if you are in the building at closing you are allowed to stay,” Darnell said. “GW has a lot of new buildings that need security this year, we’re struggling to expand to meet all this year’s new security requirements.”

This post was updated to reflect the following correction:
The Hatchet incorrectly reported that Associate Dean of Students Tim Miller said GW will create an arts affinity for Corcoran students to live in next fall. Miller did not speak during the program. Seth Weinshel, who runs GW’s housing office, said students applied to live in an arts affinity next fall. We regret this error.

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Sunday, Feb. 22, 2015 8:49 p.m.

Fire breaks out at Potomac Plaza Terraces

Firefighters exit Potomac Plaza Terraces, after residents were evacuated Sunday night due to an oven fire on the sixth floor. Desiree Halpern | Contributing Photo Editor

Firefighters exit Potomac Plaza Terraces after residents were evacuated Sunday night due to an oven fire on the sixth floor. Desiree Halpern | Contributing Photo Editor

Residents were evacuated after a fire broke out at the Potomac Plaza Terraces on Sunday night, D.C. Fire and EMS spokesman Tim Wilson said.

At least 10 police and fire vehicles arrived on the 700 block of 24th Street at about 6:45 p.m. after residents said a kitchen fire broke out on the sixth floor of the apartment complex.

Rebekah Genauer, who lives in the building, said an oven fire started in the kitchen of a sixth-floor apartment, which then spread to the panelling of the room. She added that the firefighters were using water on the sixth and seventh floors.

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Smoke was reported between the Rosslyn and Foggy Bottom Metro stations Saturday night.

The smoke was reported at about 8:30 p.m. on the inbound track from Rosslyn, the Washington Post reported.

A Metro spokesman told the Post that there were no trains in the tunnel at the time and no injuries were reported, but the incident did cause single tracking and delays of five to 10 minutes. The incident may have been a maintenance problem.

More than five emergency vehicles were outside the station after the incident was reported, but firefighters did not go into the tunnel, the Post reported.

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The University Counseling Center and Students Promoting Eating Disorder Awareness and Knowledge at GW co-hosted a national Twitter chat with the Student Affairs Collective Thursday about eating-disorder awareness.

The SA Collective, an online community of student affairs professionals, holds Twitter chats every Thursday featuring chosen topics from different universities’ divisions of student affairs. Dean of Student Affairs Peter Konwerski, SPEAK GW and the UCC, along with people across the nation, tweeted thoughts about eating disorders on college campuses.

People who planned to participate in the chat voted Wednesday to discuss “promoting eating-disorder awareness initiatives on college campuses.”

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Between 1 and 2 p.m. and from 7 to 8 p.m. Thursday, students and administrators from universities nationwide responded to the SA Collective’s questions with the #sachat.

Here’s what GW campus leaders said about eating-disorder awareness on campus.

welcome gw

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Mayor Muriel Bowser speaks before ANC members, discussing marijuana and homelessness  Jordan McDonald | Hatchet Photographer

Mayor Muriel Bowser speaks before ANC members, discussing marijuana and homelessness Jordan McDonald | Hatchet Photographer

Updated: Feb. 19, 2015 at 11:52 a.m.

This post was written by Hatchet reporter Sophie Kaplan.

Mayor Muriel Bowser highlighted her plans for creating next year’s citywide budget and solving homelessness at the Foggy Bottom and West End Advisory Neighborhood Commission on Wednesday night, sharing her goals for the future of D.C. after her first month and a half in office.

Bowser said her primary concern was creating the new budget for the city in order to “close the $80 million gap.” Instead of hearing from D.C. residents after she writes the budget, Bowser said she’ll hold three budget engagement forums before she puts pen to paper, a move that breaks from how past D.C. mayors have funded the city’s programs. Former Mayor Vincent Gray, an alumnus, used to give budget presentations in different areas of the city after the plan was created to show residents how the funds would be distributed.

“We started our engagement process to hear from the people first before making [the budget,]” Bowser said.

Philip Schrefer, an ANC commissioner, asked Bowser whether or not she will increasing the salaries for her staff. She said that her distribution for salaries were 5 percent less than last administration.

“It is hard to negotiate a salary when they know how much the last person made,” Bowser said, calling her staff “energetic and competitive people”.

The mayor also held a question-and-answer session, taking questions from other members of the advisory board like William Kennedy Smith, who asked her how she planned to get homeless people off the streets. Bowser said D.C. cannot tackle the issue with one solution because homelessness can stem from various situations.

She added that D.C. will “go back” to giving homeless people housing first, which she said is part of her plan to end family homelessness by 2018.

“We have approached homelessness as a monolith,” she said. “If we are really serious about dealing with homelessness, this is the price.”

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The D.C. rabbi accused of filming Orthodox Jewish women during a ritual bath is expected to plead guilty to 52 counts of voyeurism in D.C. court Thursday afternoon, the Washington Post reported.

Prosecutors said last week that Rabbi Barry Freundel may have secretly videotaped as many as 150 women during the ritual, known as a mikvah bath, at his Georgetown synagogue, the Post reported. Freundel will appear in court at 1 p.m.

Prosecutors have asked for extensions on his case twice as they continued to review evidence. Freundel was fired from his synagogue, Kesher Israel on 28th and N streets, in November following the accusations.

Freundel taught religion courses as a part-time faculty member at GW as recently as 2008. One of the alleged victims is alumna Stephanie Doucette, who met with Freundel during her time at GW to begin the conversion process to Orthodox Judaism.

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Ruby Corado, founder of Casa Ruby, the only bilingual, multicultural LGBT organization in D.C., gave the keynote address as part of Allied in Greek Week. Katie Causey | Hatchet Staff Photographer

Ruby Corado, founder of Casa Ruby, the only bilingual, multicultural LGBT organization in D.C., gave the keynote address as part of Allied in Greek Week. Katie Causey | Hatchet Staff Photographer

Ruby Corado, founder of D.C.’s only bilingual, multicultural LGBT advocacy group Casa Ruby, spoke Wednesday in Funger Hall as part of Allied in Greek week, sharing stories about how her own experiences as a transgender immigrant motivated her to support impoverished LGBT teens.

Corado, a transgender woman who has worked in LGBT advocacy for over twenty years, told an audience filled with Greek life and Allied in Pride members about her inspiration for the organization and how students can get involved.

Allied in Greek changed its programming and philanthropy this year, and one hundred percent of proceeds from this week’s events will go to Casa Ruby. Here are three takeaways from Corado’s presentation:

1. Celebrating differences and challenging society

Corado began her address with anecdotes about how she felt different as an immigrant and transgender woman.

“People put all these labels on you so they can show you you’re different,” Corado said. “It’s up to me to create more positive labels for myself. “

After Corado transitioned to a woman, she faced issues of homelessness and discrimination, she said. In the mid-1990′s Corado began challenging society’s prejudice against people who are LGBT, she said. She has since helped write and pass legislation for LGBT advocacy.

“I felt like I loved myself so much that I started caring about the world and I could be an advocate,” Corado said.

2. Opening her home

Twenty-three years ago, Corado began opening her home to friends whose “places to sleep were actually a living hell,” she said. Opening her own home to friends inspired Corado to open an agency targeting people who faced as members of the LGBT community.

“I opened it to show them that there is a part of this world that really cares about them and that there’s a place in this city where they can be themselves,” Corado said.

Casa Ruby’s mission is to help impoverished LGBT youth create successful lives for themselves.

“Even if they still have shitty lives, they can come to Casa Ruby and be happy and have a good day,” Corado said.

3. Getting GW involved

Casa Ruby will open a house with twelve beds for homeless LGBT youth this year, Corado said. Money raised this week through Allied in Greek will benefit the shelter.

Universities are communities that Corado focuses on engaging with, because “you never know who’s sitting in the room,” she said.

Students can contribute to Casa Ruby through volunteering to decorate the new homeless shelter, sending cards to clients or donating money, Corado said.

“You all have the power to touch the lives of others,” Corado said. “We can definitely create a better world.”

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