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West End Market will have its liquor license back in time for classes after serving a 30 day suspension by D.C.’s Alcoholic Beverage Control Board.

The market on Pennsylvania Avenue near Georgetown will be able to resume selling alcoholic beverages August 20, according to a document from the agency that regulates liquor licenses in the city. In addition to receiving the 30 day suspension of the license which began July 20, West End was also required to pay a $12,000 fine and comply with stipulations on the sale of alcoholic beverages after the suspension ends.

The board forbade one employee, Jeung Kim, from selling alcoholic beverages at the store and ordered the termination of another employee, Richard Kim. When the market receives its liquor license again next month, only the newly hired employees will be eligible to sell alcohol, according to the document.

“All such employees will be trained on ID compliance. At least one employee will obtain an ABC Manager’s license,” the document reads, referring to the new employees. The new employees must also be trained 30 days after they begin working.

The market was charged with 22 violations of liquor sale laws in March, including the sale of alcohol to persons under 21 years of age, failing to “take reasonable steps to determine that persons to whom alcoholic beverages are sold are under age 21″ and for permitting the store “to be used for an unlawful purpose.”

During a hearing with the agency July 8, Eun Corporation, which operates West End Market, agreed to the sanctions above to resolve the 22 charges.

Hwan Eun, president of Eun Corporation, did not respond to requests for comment. The lawyer on behalf of the company, Rema Zadah, said she could not provide comment because of the subject of litigation.

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Updated: July 22,2015 at 2:27 p.m.

Two suspects are now in custody after an attempted off-campus carjacking early Wednesday morning, a Metropolitan Police Department spokeswoman confirmed.

MPD officers shot at the suspects as they fled in the direction of campus, according to a campus alert. MPD spokeswoman Gwendolyn Crump said the suspects were not injured by the gun shots.

MPD officers notified the University Police Department of the situation at about 3:30 a.m. on Wednesday, according to a campus alert.

A male suspect had been captured by police by 3:40 a.m., and another unarmed suspect had fled in the direction of campus. The second suspect was captured after a resident student alerted UPD to a “a suspicious person hiding” by Munson Hall at 22nd and I streets, according to a campus alert.

GW sent two text messages and three emails about the incident, with the first text alert arriving at 3:42 a.m.

“Residual” police activity on campus continued into the morning, according to the alert. As MPD continues its investigation, officers are at the Foggy Bottom Metro station, on 2000 Pennsylvania Ave. and at 23rd Street,. 23rd Street between H and G streets was partially shut down as part of the investigation, but fully reopened by 8:45 a.m.

“Campus safety is a community responsibility, and we thank our community member for her awareness and actions, which led MPD to be able to make a quick arrest,” one campus alert said.

Jacqueline Thomsen contributed reporting.

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José Andrés delivered the Commencement address to the Class of 2015. Hatchet File Photo | Senior Staff Photographer

José Andrés delivered the Commencement address to the Class of 2015. Hatchet File Photo


One D.C. resident thinks celebrity chef José Andrés should “dump Trump.”

And the idea is catching on. About 680 people have signed a Change.org petition asking Andrés to rethink plans to open his eighth D.C.-based restaurant in the media mogul’s Trump International Hotel, which is set to open on Pennsylvania Avenue and 11th Street next year.

Erick Sanchez, a D.C. resident and Mexican American, started the petition three days ago, the Washington Post reported. The petition comes after remarks Trump made against Mexican immigrants during his presidential campaign announcement, when he said “they’re bringing drugs, they’re bringing crime, they’re rapists, and some, I assume, are good people.”

“Growing up my dad always told me you’re only as good as the company you keep, and I think he would benefit professionally from cutting ties,” the petition reads.

Since the comments, Macy’s, NBC and Univision, the Spanish-language network that broadcasts Trump-sponsored beauty pageants, announced they would cut ties with him.

Andrés, who emigrated from Spain, tweeted last week that his “views on immigration are clear. All men and women should be treated respectfully regardless of their status.” A former adjunct professor at GW and a member of GW’s Urban Food Task Force, Andrés opened a restaurant on campus last spring, and was the University Commencement speaker in 2014.

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Protesters marched down Pennsylvania Avenue, part of a protest against police brutality. Desiree Halpern | Photo Editor

Protesters marched down Pennsylvania Avenue, part of a protest against police brutality. The protest lasted about two hours in total. Desiree Halpern | Photo Editor

This post was written by Hatchet news editors Eva Palmer and Robin Eberhardt.

About 30 people marched from Chinatown to outside the Corcoran’s 17th Street building Tuesday protesting against police brutality, one day after Baltimore erupted in riots.

The group said they were marching in support of Freddie Gray, a 25-year old black man who died after his spine was severed following an arrest by Baltimore Police Department officers on April 19. Chanting phrases like “black lives matter,” the protestors stood and sat in the middle of major intersections across the city.

The group of protestors – escorted down the streets by members of the Metropolitan Police Department – started in front of the Chinatown Metro station, first standing and blocking the intersection of G and 7th Streets. As members of the group walked from 7th Street to Pennsylvania Avenue, some protestors used megaphones to address bystanders, asking them to join the protest.

Tia Correy addresses protestors outside an entrance to the White House. Desiree Halpern | Photo Editor

Tia Correy addresses protestors outside an entrance to the White House. Desiree Halpern | Senior Photo Editor

Erin Agnew, a sophomore who sat on the ground in the middle of the intersection of 15th Street and New York Avenue with other protesters, said that the protest group was acting in solidarity with the “black lives matter” movement that started in Ferguson, Mo. after Michael Brown, an unarmed black man, was shot and killed by a police officer in August. In November, a grand jury ruled not to indict the officer in that incident.

The D.C. protestors remained peaceful throughout the night.

“Personally, it’s about garnering positive media attention and understanding that there are peaceful movements that are being falsely portrayed as violent,” Agnew said.

The protestors stopped twice in front of the White House and blocked traffic, once on the 15th Street side and once on the 16th Street side. The Secret Service had already partitioned off the area in front of the White House, following a reception Tuesday to welcome Japanese Prime Minister Shinzō Abe.

Bria Gibson marches with other protestors towards Pennsylvania Ave. Desiree Halpern | Photo Editor

Maryland resident Bria Gibson marches with other protestors towards Pennsylvania Ave. Desiree Halpern | Photo Editor

Bria Gibson, a 21-year-old who lives in Maryland and works in D.C., said the group that consisted of people of different races who wanted to show a peaceful protest and “shut down police brutality.”

“Yes, we’re sitting down here right now but we’re here for a purpose,” Gibson said. “And that purpose is to show people around the world that we are not going to take anything laying down.”

The protestors then marched down 16th Street, yelling things like “This is a protest, not a riot,” to the Secret Service agents who walked beside them as they passed the Eisenhower Executive Office Building.

Tia Correy, one of the people leading the protest with a megaphone, told the group that even though her grandfather is white, she is still “automatically targeted” by police because she is black. Still, Correy said the group needed to remain peaceful.

“They want you to get mad, because they want you to say that they had to have all those police come out,” Correy said to the other protesters. “But we’re not going to be like that.”

Protestors sat in the intersection of 15th Street and New York Avenue for more than 30 minutes, blocking traffic. Desiree Halpern | Photo Editor

Protestors sat in the intersection of 15th Street and New York Avenue for more than 30 minutes, blocking traffic. Desiree Halpern | Photo Editor

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A stabbing at a nightclub near campus Saturday left one man with serious injuries.

The man was stabbed at the New Zanzibar Nightclub, located at 1901 Pennsylvania Ave., following an argument, police told the Washington Post. Thirty-five-year-old Joseph Ricardo Johnson of Northeast D.C. was arrested and charged with assault with intent to kill in the case.

It marks the second stabbing near campus in the past two weekends, after an attack with a knife at McFadden’s on Dec. 27 left five people seriously injured. The bar’s liquor license was suspended after the incident, and police are searching for two persons of interest in the case.

The victim in the Zanzibar case was taken to the hospital with serious injuries, WUSA 9 reported. Police were called to the scene at about 1:10 a.m.

Metropolitan Police Department Chief Cathy Lanier ordered the nightclub to shut down for 96 hours after the incident.

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Sunday, Dec. 28, 2014 8:13 p.m.

McFadden’s temporarily closed after stabbing

McFaddens

McFadden’s is temporarily closed after five people were stabbed there early Saturday morning. None of the victims are GW students. Hatchet File Photo

Updated: Dec. 29, 2014 at 10:01 p.m.

McFadden’s was ordered closed for 96 hours after a stabbing early Saturday morning left five people seriously injured.

Metropolitan Police Department Chief Cathy Lanier ordered the restaurant closed until New Year’s Eve, CBS D.C. and the Associated Press reported. A notice on the door of the restaurant stated that the bar’s liquor license had been suspended.

“The Chief of Police finds that the continued operation of this establishment would present an imminent danger to the health, safety and welfare of the public,” the notice read.

None of the victims are GW students, University spokeswoman Maralee Csellar said Monday.

Two police officers were assaulted during the fight, the Washington Post reported. Lanier wrote in the closure letter that the restaurant was overcrowded, one of the victims was underage and the staff did not immediately answer police officers’ questions about the incident.

“The club’s security protocols allowed a knife-wielding subject to enter the club, stab five patrons, and escape without capture,” Lanier wrote, adding that McFadden’s three security guards did not have experience with crowd control.

The D.C. Alcoholic Beverage Control Board could keep the restaurant closed beyond New Year’s Eve after conducting its own investigation, the Post reported.

Police say all five victims are expected to survive, WJLA and the AP reported. The father of one of the victims told ABC7 that the group had been celebrating a birthday at McFadden’s.

A GW alert described a suspect as a 5’7″ or 5’8″ black man wearing a plaid shirt, blue or black pants and a tan trench coat. He was last seen heading east down Pennsylvania Avenue after the incident at about 12:30 a.m.

McFadden’s did not return multiple requests for comment.

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McFaddens

Five people were reportedly stabbed in McFadden’s early Saturday morning. Hatchet File Photo

Updated: Dec. 27, 2014 at 12:15 p.m.

Five people were reportedly stabbed inside McFadden’s early Saturday morning, according to the Metropolitan Police Department.

The suspect, a 5’7″ or 5’8″ black man, was wearing a plaid shirt, blue or black pants and a tan trench coat, according to a GW alert sent at about 2:30 a.m. The suspect was last seen heading east on Pennsylvania Avenue, according to the alert.

All five victims were sent to a hospital, and the suspect remains at large, said MPD public information officer Hugh Carew. He said he did not know which hospital provided the victims treatment and he did not have an update on their condition.

University spokeswoman Maralee Csellar did not immediately return a request for comment about whether any of the victims are affiliated with GW.

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A peaceful protestor stands in front of the White House, while other protestors chanted and sang. Samuel Klein | Senior Photo Editor

A protester stands in front of the White House, while others chanted and sang. Samuel Klein | Senior Photo Editor

Students from GW and Georgetown, American and Howard universities gathered outside the White House on Monday night to protest a St. Louis County grand jury’s decision not to indict police officer Darren Wilson, who shot and killed unarmed black teenager Michael Brown in August.

The student protesters led chants, sang hymns and carried signs protesting the decision as they marched from U Street to the White House. About 200 flocked to the demonstrations outside the White House and shouted chants like “Hands up, don’t shoot” while some held up signs that read “stop racist police terror” and “Justice for Mike Brown.”

Demonstrators then held a moment of silence that lasted four and a half minutes to honor Brown, whose body was not moved from the street for four and a half hours after he was shot and killed.

GW sophomore Frank Fritz said he came to the protest to “stand with the people of Ferguson.”

“GW has always stressed that we take what we learn and put it into practice,” he said. “It’s up to students to finally stand up against racism and fear that captures this society that allows black youths to be gunned down.”

Protesters then sang hymns and shouted chants for about 30 minutes before at least 100 people lay down on the ground in the middle of Pennsylvania Avenue, chanting “Black lives matter.”

Students from American, Howard, Georgetown and George Washington Universities lay on the ground in front of the White House in protest of a grand jury decision not to press charges against officer Darren Wilson in the shooting of Michael Brown. Samuel Klein | Senior Photo Editor

Students from GW and American, Howard and Georgetown universities lay on the ground in front of the White House in protest of a grand jury decision not to press charges against officer Darren Wilson in the shooting of Michael Brown. Samuel Klein | Senior Photo Editor

By midnight, most of the protesters had left the White House, with many headed to the Capitol building. Some stayed to continue singing hymns.

Another GW student, junior Nicole Martin, said she came to the White House to experience firsthand the protests she had seen on the news.

“This is one of those moments to see it all right before our eyes,” she said.

Students from Howard, American and Georgetown Universities poured in front of the White House in protest of a grand jury decision to not bring charges against police officer Darren Wilson for the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. this past August. Samuel Klein | Senior Photo Editor

Students and D.C. residents poured in front of the White House to protest the grand jury decision. Samuel Klein | Senior Photo Editor

Brandon Lee contributed reporting.

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Police are searching for two men who reportedly snatched “a few dollars” from a female student’s hand as she was waiting at a bus stop near campus.

Neither of the suspects were armed and were last seen fleeing east on Pennsylvania Avenue, according to an alert the University sent Thursday at about 2 a.m. The men allegedly robbed the student across the street from the GW Medical Faculty Associates building at 22nd Street and Pennsylvania Avenue.

One suspect is a skinny black man in his 20s with “tight cornrows and scruffy facial hair,” and was carrying a white bag, according to the alert. The other suspect is a black man in his 20s wearing black shorts and no shirt.

University Police Department Chief Kevin Hay did not immediately return a request for comment.

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Pennsylvania Avenue, Froggy Bottom Pub, rendering

The 11-story building will have a quarter-million square feet of office space and 7,000 square feet of street-level retail. Rendering courtesy of the Office of Community Relations.

The University announced Tuesday that it had chosen a developer to begin a multi-million dollar renovation project at 2100 Pennsylvania Ave.

Skanska USA Commercial Development Inc. will convert an office, two University buildings and four restaurants into an 11-story structure with a glass curtain exterior overlooking Pennsylvania Avenue.

Headquartered in New York, Swedish-owned Skanska announced that it would also serve as a general contractor and self-finance the project, which will include 250,000 square feet of office space and 7,000 square feet for restaurants and shops on the ground level. Gensler will serve as the architect.

Skanska has not yet determined when the project will break ground, the Washington Business Journal reported. It also has not yet estimated how much construction will cost.

“The opportunity to bring a new development to Pennsylvania Avenue doesn’t come along very often,” Robert Ward, Skanska executive vice president and regional manager, said in a release.

The building will receive a stamp of approval for its environmentally friendly design, earning a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Gold certification.

The renovation means the restaurants currently lining the block will have to close shop soon. The Froggy Bottom Pub moved to a new K Street location last year, and the owners of Thai Place opened a new restaurant on L Street last month. But the Thai Place owners have said that they don’t know when they need to clear their Pennsylvania Avenue store.

Lou Katz, the University’s executive vice president and treasurer, said in the release that the project would enhance the Foggy Bottom neighborhood.

“We are certain that Skanska will deliver a world-class office building at the edge of our campus on Pennsylvania Avenue,” Katz said.

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