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At 3 p.m. Tuesday, students gathered in Kogan Plaza before marching to the White House and later Rice Hall in protest of President-elect Donald Trump.

 

Nearly 400 members of The George Washington University community descended into Kogan Plaza on Tuesday at 3:00 PM to protest the President-Elect of the United States, Donald Trump, and many policy items that the Trump campaign discussed during the election. Alyssa Bogosian | Hatchet Staff Photographer

About 400 students, faculty and staff members descended on Kogan Plaza Tuesday afternoon to protest President-elect Trump.  Alyssa Bogosian | Hatchet Staff Photographer

 

Many people took to Facebook Live and other live-streaming apps to boost the reach of the protest and to recruit more people to attend. Jack Borowiak | Hatchet Photographer

Some supporters used Facebook Live and other live-streaming apps to boost the protest’s reach and to recruit more people to attend. Jack Borowiak | Hatchet Photographer

 

Senior Becky Gardner took to the megaphone and used her own personal experiences to denounce the past words and actions of Donald Trump. Sam Hardgrove | Assistant Photo Editor

Senior Becky Gardner addressed the crowd with a megaphone to share her personal experiences and to denounce Trump’s actions and stances. Sam Hardgrove | Assistant Photo Editor

 

Freshman Kevin Hitchings was one of a few Trump supporters in attendance as a show of solidarity to the President-Elect. Sam Hardgrove | Assistant Photo Editor

Freshman Kevin Hitchings was one of a few Trump supporters to attend the gathering in Kogan Plaza. Sam Hardgrove | Assistant Photo Editor

 

Many supporters, including Emelio Jimenez pictured here, led the group in chants including, "tell me what democracy looks like. This is what democracy looks like." Keegan Mullen | Hatchet Photographer

Emelio Jimenez led the group in chants as the protestors moved down I Street. Keegan Mullen | Hatchet Photographer

 

Supporters marched down Pennsylvania Avenue, in front of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building. Jack Borowiak | Hatchet Photographer

Protestors marched down Pennsylvania Ave. in front of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building. Jack Borowiak | Hatchet Photographer

 

Keiko Tsuboi, ESIA-U, a leader of the protest, uses a microphone to align the supporters in front of the White House. Keegan Mullen | Hatchet Photographer

Keiko Tsuboi, a leader of the protest and a Student Association senator, addressed supporters once they reached the White House. Keegan Mullen | Hatchet Photographer

 

Supporters gathered outside the White House's gates and listen to various student speakers. Jack Borowiak | Hatchet Photographer

Protestors gathered outside the White House’s gates and listened as various students spoke about their fears for a Trump presidency. Jack Borowiak | Hatchet Photographer

 

The supporters ended their protest by congregating around Rice Hall, home to The George Washington University administration, and presenting their demands. Jack Borowiak | Hatchet Photographer

Supporters ended the protest congregating around Rice Hall, where GW administrators work, to present officials with a list of demands to support marginalized students. Jack Borowiak | Hatchet Photographer

 

In the windows of Rice Hall, university employees gathered and drew a sign of support for the protest below. Keegan Mullen | Hatchet Photographer

In the windows of Rice Hall, University employees gathered to support for the protest below. Keegan Mullen | Hatchet Photographer

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Elliott School of International Affairs Dean Reuben Brigety, pictured speaking, will be appointed to the National Security Education Board.  Jack Borowiak | Hatchet Photographer

Elliott School of International Affairs Dean Reuben Brigety, pictured speaking, will be appointed to the National Security Education Board. Jack Borowiak | Hatchet Photographer

Updated: Oct. 31, 2016 at 3:19 p.m.

Reuben Brigety, the dean of the Elliott School of International Affairs, will likely become a member of the National Security Education Board, according to a White House press release.

The release said President Barack Obama intends to appoint Brigety, as well as other individuals including several professors and educators, to various “key administration posts.”

“These fine public servants bring a depth of experience and tremendous dedication to their important roles. I look forward to working with them,” Obama said in the release.

The National Security Education Board is a 14-member board made up of eight Cabinet-level departments and six presidential appointments, according to its website. The NSEB advises the National Security Education Program on skills needed on the national security workforce and provides guidance on “hiring practices, internships and clearances, as well as to assist in crafting policy and guidelines,” according to the board’s website.

Brigety came to the University at the beginning of the last academic year. Before then he served as the U.S. representative to the African Union and as a deputy assistant secretary in the Bureau of African Affairs and in the Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration.

This post has been updated to reflect the following clarification:
Brigety will remain dean of the Elliott School while serving on the NSEB, as the administrative position is a part-time post.

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A recent alumnus and current White House staffer’s email account was hacked this week, revealing political documents and messages from his time at GW.

The hacked Gmail account belonged to Ian Mellul, a White House staffer who is currently working on Hillary Clinton’s Democratic presidential campaign. The website DC Leaks, which claims to be started by American hackers, released the email correspondence Thursday morning.

Mellul, who graduated from GW in 2015 with a bachelor’s degree in political science, was a member of Pi Kappa Phi fraternity and a leader of the Colonial Army. The leak includes emails from February 2015 through this July.

The leaked emails include correspondence between members of Pi Kappa Phi fraternity at GW. The emails between members have information about mixers, pledges, other Greek life organizations and the group’s test bank.

“For the pledges who show up to this, please make them your slaves,” one member of the fraternity wrote on Feb. 18, 2015, according to an email obtained by DC Leaks and allegedly received by Mellul.

The emails also include correspondence between Mellul and Director of Athletics and Recreation Patrick Nero from when Mellul served as leader of the Colonial Army and his messages with various GW professors.

Along with the emails, the hackers released a copy of First Lady Michelle Obama’s passport and other internal documents, including planning and travel information with Clinton’s detailed schedule.

Mellul deleted his Twitter and LinkedIn accounts Thursday morning.

The Secret Service said Thursday that officers are “aware” of the alleged hacks of a White House employee but did not confirm the authenticity of the passport photo or other communications, The Hill reported.

 

Earlier in September, DC Leaks claimed responsibility for leaking emails from former Secretary of State Colin Powell and messages from the Democratic National Committee.

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Members of the U.S. House of Representatives linked arms with protesters and marched down Pennsylvania Avenue. Dan Rich | Photo Editor

Members of the U.S. House of Representatives linked arms with protesters and marched down Pennsylvania Avenue. Dan Rich | Photo Editor

Hundreds of people congregated around the north face of the White House Thursday evening to protest the fatal police shootings of two black men, Alton Sterling and Philando Castile.

Led by Deondre Moore, a junior at Sam Houston State University, the protestors marched a clear path down Pennsylvania Avenue to the Capitol, chanting and singing “We Shall Overcome” as they passed.

“We can’t just protest, we have to unify,” Moore said.

Demonstrators were met on the steps of the Capitol by a blockade of 20 policemen and women, who prevented the marchers from entering the building itself.

Around 9:30 p.m., 13 members of Congress, including civil rights leader Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., came out to speak to the protestors behind the blockade. They urged for peace and pursuing democratic policies over violence, although the crowd often interrupted them with cries for accountability.

Shouts of “do your job” and “we want answers” cut through the speeches, making them almost incomprehensible to most of the people in the crowd.

Finally, the members of Congress pushed through the blockade to join the crowd and walk with them back to the White House, where they stayed and spoke to the protestors one-on-one.

“[I felt] empowered, elated, inflamed,” said Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill. “Ain’t nothing like the power of the youth because the power of the youth don’t stop.”

A bullhorn was also passed around the crowd so people could share their personal testimonies, thoughts and suggestions for the future. Members of the crowd also shared feelings of weariness with the status quo over the volume and frequency of police violence against the black community.

Many of the demonstrators in the crowd had their own personal experiences that inspired them to join the protest.

Sherri Joyner, a legal assistant in D.C., recounted how she was arrested and shoved into a van after a domestic incident in 2009, despite her repeated pleas that she was claustrophobic. Her screams to be released went unheard, and when she was finally allowed out of the van the policemen told her if she ran they would shoot.

“That’s a mentality that has been born and bred,” said Joyner. “I don’t think its every officer, but it’s something that is brewing and boiling over.”

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Wednesday, May 25, 2016 10:24 p.m.

Congress votes against D.C. budget autonomy

Congress approved a bill that rejects budget autonomy in D.C., The Hill reported Wednesday.

The approved bill repeals the D.C. Budget Autonomy Act, which would have allowed city officials to control how locally raised funds are spent. More than 80 percent of District residents approved of budget autonomy in a 2013 referendum, and a D.C. Superior Court judge ruled in favor of the budget autonomy act in March.

The new bill, supported by Republicans and two Democratic members of the House of Representatives Wednesday, blocks D.C. from being able to spend funds on things like abortion clinics or regulating marijuana without Congressional approval. Republicans like Rep. Mark Meadows, R-NC, the chairman of the House Oversight subcommittee, argued that the budget autonomy measure violates the 1973 Home Rule Act, which established Congressional oversight for D.C.’s funds.

Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D.C.’s non-voting representative in Congress, called the legislation “undemocratic” during the House meeting.

“It is profoundly undemocratic for any member of Congress in the 21st century to declare that he has authority over any jurisdiction except his own,” Norton said, according to The Hill.

The president’s advisers will recommend that U.S. President Barack Obama veto the Republican bill, according to a statement from the White House. The president “strongly supports” D.C. budget autonomy, according to the statement.

“Subjecting the District to the lengthy and uncertain congressional appropriations process for its use of local tax collections imposes both operational and financial hardships on the District, burdens not borne by any other local government in the country,” according to the statement.

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Monday, March 28, 2016 3:27 p.m.

Shooter in custody at U.S. Capitol

One Capitol police officer has been shot and the shooter is in custody, the Associated Press reported Monday.

The AP reported that one police officer was shot, but his injuries are not believed to be serious.

Reports of shots fired in the Capitol building’s visitor’s center began surfacing around 2:50 pm Monday. Immediately following the shooting, Capitol police placed the building and surrounding areas, including the White House, on lockdown. The White House lockdown has since been lifted, according to the AP.

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A crowd of several hundred gathered in Lafayette Square near the White House on Saturday evening to show solidarity for the people of France. At least 129 people were killed and hundreds more injured in coordinated attacks across Paris on Friday night, the New York times reported.

Updated Nov. 15, 2015 at 10:40p.m.

Paige James | Hatchet Photographer

A group gathered in Lafayette Square on Saturday as the sun began to set. French Ambassador to the United States, Gérard Araud had announced the vigil on Twitter earlier in the day. Paige James | Hatchet Photographer

 

While some attendees held signs of support others carried red, white, and blue flower – the colors of the French tricolor – which they laid at the base of the Statue of the Marquis de Lafayette. Marquis de Lafayette, a French aristocrat and officer who fought in the Revolutionary War, is often viewed as a symbol of strength between the alliance of France and the United States. Paige James | Hatchet Photographer

While some attendees held signs of support others carried red, white, and blue flower – the colors of the French tricolor – which they laid at the base of the Statue of the Marquis de Lafayette. Marquis de Lafayette, a French aristocrat and officer who fought in the Revolutionary War, is often viewed as a symbol of strength between the alliance of France and the United States. Paige James | Hatchet Photographer

 

Araud spoke about the importance of standing with the people of France in the wake of the attacks. Paige James | Hatchet Photographer

Araud spoke about the importance of standing with the people of France in the wake of the attacks. Paige James | Hatchet Photographer

 

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Sukiuye Yiildirim, who is from Turkey, held a sign calling for peace as Araud spoke. Paige James | Hatchet Photographer

 

Yiildirim shared her sign with the crowd, who added their signatures in support. Paige James | Hatchet Photographer

Yiildirim shared her sign with the crowd, who added their signatures in support. Paige James | Hatchet Photographer

 

Members of the crowd sang

Members of the crowd sang “La Marseillaise,” the French national anthem, as the French tricolor flew overhead. Paige James | Hatchet Photographer

 

Jillian DiPersio | Hatchet Photographer

Petite Valentine holds a small sign which reads “#NotAfraid #ParisIsAboutLife friends from the whole world, thank you for #prayforParis, but we don’t need more religion! Our faith goes to music! Kisses! Life! Champagne and Joy! #ParisisaboutLife” Jillian DiPersio | Hatchet Photographer

 

Jillian DiPersio | Hatchet Photographer

Amanda Tatun holds a candle at the vigil. Jillian DiPersio | Hatchet Photographer

 

Jillian DiPersio | Hatchet Photographer

Sophie Bethune (left) a D.C. resident, stands with her sons, Ewan Bethune-Smith age three and Soren Bethune-Smith age six, as candles are distributed to the crowd. Jillian DiPersio | Hatchet Photographer

 

Jillian DiPersio | Hatchet Photographer

“We Stand with Paris” the network which promoted the vigil on social media, has promoted vigils in major cities across the United States today to show solidarity with the people of France. Jillian DiPersio | Hatchet Photographer

 

This post was updated to reflect the following correction:
The Hatchet incorrectly spelled Ewan Bethune-Smith’s name in a photo caption. We regret this error.

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Updated: Nov. 9, 2015 at 12:44 p.m.

This post was written by Hatchet reporter Mabel Kabani.

The White House kicked off the national week of action this week for the “It’s On Us” campaign, a national movement to end sexual assault on college campuses.

To jumpstart the week, CollegeHumor partnered with “It’s On Us” to create a PSA centered on the specific statistic that one in five women will be sexually assaulted by the time they leave college. They announced the video during a press phone call on Thursday.

Though a serious issue, Spencer Griffin, executive producer of CollegeHumor, said he wanted to create a funny digital short to spread the message.

“We wanted to leverage comedy to reach and break through this generation. I am proud of this video and the impact it can have,” Griffin said.

New Girl actor Jake Johnson, star of the digital short, also spoke during the press call about his interest in the campaign because “hearing the one in five statistic sickened him.”

“I think that this is something worth doing and something worth getting out,” Johnson said. “Comedy is a great way to reach people with important messages and we need to make the world a better place for other people.”

Johnson added that the campaign can meet college students where they are to really make a difference.

“I just like that this campaign makes it the community’s responsibility because it’s on you to make sure you help out,” he said. “It’s a way to reach people not involved in policy.”

“It’s On Us” was launched by President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden last year to end the issue of sexual assault on college campuses nationwide. What separates this initiative from the others is that it asks everyone, men, women and children across America, to make a commitment and be a part of the solution to end campus assault.

University President Steven Knapp and Student Association president Nick Gumas attended a kickoff event at the White House last year.

White House Senior Advisor Valerie Jarrett said during the call that it has become “a rallying cry inviting everyone to engage, because solutions begin with us.”

Over 250,000 students have signed the “It’s On Us” pledge and the initiative has launched 800 events so far.

As a part of the Week of Action next week, 249 events, such as pledge drives, lectures, social media chat rooms and other student led events, will take place at 92 schools.

Biden will also be attending a few schools to participate in roundtable discussions on sexual assault.

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Nancy Pelosi spoke at the Jack Morton Auditorium Tuesday morning. Jordan McDonald | Hatchet Staff Photographer

Nancy Pelosi spoke at the Jack Morton Auditorium Tuesday morning. Jordan McDonald | Hatchet Staff Photographer

This post was written by Hatchet reporter Pim Anukularmphai.

House of Representatives Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi discussed her experience in governing Tuesday afternoon in the Jack Morton Auditorium.

Just hours before the discussion, congressional leaders reached a tentative budget deal for the next year. Pelosi said the first word that came to mind was “hurray!” because the budget maintains current allocations for disabilities and Medicare spending, and equally divides defense and domestic expenditures.

“Our strength is measured in the education and innovation of our people,” she said.

School of Media and Public Affairs Director Frank Sesno, a former White House and CNN correspondent, moderated the conversation.

Couldn’t skip class for the event? Here’s what you missed:

1. What’s in it for me?

In a discussion about the polls for the 2016 presidential election, Pelosi said Americans will vote for who they believe can “end the inequality in our system.”

“At the end of the day, it’s all personal. We’re asking ourselves, ‘what does this mean for me?'” she said, in regard to choosing whether or not to support a candidate’s politics.

Pelosi gave a nod to former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton when Senso asked what the elections mean for Pelosi.

“I will be happy to relinquish my title as the highest ranking woman in America,” Pelosi said.

2. Climate change is everyone’s responsibility

Pelosi said every nation should “do what they can” to be proactive about environmental issues.

She said the responsibility has fallen on third-world countries, which are disproportionately impacted by global warming, to prepare for higher tides, temperatures and volatile weather, but Pelosi said she wants to change that.

At the United Nations Climate Change Conference, which will be held later this month in Paris, Pelosi said she would advocate for environmental legislation that would not be “just pretty words” but have the “force of law” behind it.

3. Social media increases transparency

Pelosi said social media has given the public greater access to politics, which she said has increased transparency within the political process.

Referring to the fact that the public was informed of the budget’s passing within minutes Monday night, Sesno asked Pelosi how the role of social media has impacted politics.

“People knew what was going on because they were paying attention,” she said.

Sesno also asked if Pelosi supports Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., who she said has been a transparent political figure in his bid for Speaker of the House.

“I have the institution’s back,” she said.

Pelosi commended Ryan’s support of the latest budget proposal and his criticism of the House Freedom Caucus, a conservative group of congressmen, which she said would give Ryan “running room” with the Democrats in his campaign for Speaker of the House.

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On Tuesday afternoon, activists from the women-led social justice organization CODEPINK combined hula hooping with peaceful advocacy in Lafayette Square near the White House. The activists led “hooping for peace” to show support for recent nuclear negotiations with Iran.

In a landmark agreement with six nations including the United States last month, Iran agreed to limit its nuclear capability in exchange for lifted financial and oil sanctions, the New York Times reported. As part of the agreement, Iran will reduce its stockpile of the enriched uranium used to make nuclear weapons by 98 percent.

CODEPINK activist Tighe Barry described the event as “a fun way to get people aware of the Iran deal.”

Nicole Radivilov | Hatchet Staff Photographer

Medea Benjamin, a D.C. resident and co-founder of CODEPINK attended the event. Nicole Radivilov | Hatchet Staff Photographer

Nicole Radivilov | Hatchet Staff Photographer

Tourists and local residents joined in on the hula hooping. Nicole Radivilov | Hatchet Staff Photographer

Nicole Radivilov | Hatchet Staff Photographer

Alli McCracken, a D.C. resident and coordinator at CODEPINK, was one of the organizers behind the event. The inspiration for the event was to host a fun alternative to often-depressing protests. Nicole Radivilov | Hatchet Staff Photographer

Nicole Radivilov | Hatchet Staff Photographer

Media and passersby look on as activists hula hoop and share information about the Iran deal. Nicole Radivilov | Hatchet Staff Photographer

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